Loch Lomond Spring Canoe Safari

It was a breezy day with squally showers, but my guests from Ohio, USA coped admirably with the conditions.

We made our way south from the historic village of Luss close to the shore to avoid the worst effects of the wind and then made a crossing to the island of Inchtavannach in between squalls.

There we explored the capercaillie lek  and studied some of the edible and function vegetation in the area.

A short passage took us to Inchconnachan where we went on a wallaby trek. Unfortunately, none were sighted this time around but sun shone whilst there and we enjoyed the peace and tranquility of the sampling some bog myrtle we headed back across to the mainland, again between squalls. A hard push saw us into sheltered waters and an easy coast back to Luss.

Many thanks to all for a wonderful day out.

 

 

Open Canoe Safari – Loch Lomond

The first safari of 2016 took place on the 9th of April and it didn’t fail to live up to expectations; wonderful scenery, wildlife and heritage. Simon and Mairead chose to enjoy a short spring break incorporating a heritage and nature canoe safari on Loch lomond.

One of the advantages of visiting Inchconnachan early in the season is seeing the magnificent blossom on the magnolia tree.

Identifying some wallaby spoor we knew there was still a chance of seeing one. Creeping steadily through the undergrowth we saw something moving, which turned out to be a roe deer. A little further on we were rewarded with a clear view of one of the islands red necked wallabies.

After our trek we circumnavigated Inchtavannach, visiting ‘Little Peter’ en route.

My thanks to Simon and Mired for a wonderful start to the season.

Canoeing on Loch Lomond

Loch Lomond  (5th Sept.) – It was one of the sunniest days I’d experienced this year event though it was the beginning of autumn. I had the pleasure of guiding a group of medical scientist on a safari to the islands and they proved to be wonderful company.

We met at the Lodge on the Loch Hotel at Luss for the introductions and initial briefing and, once kitted up, we set forth on our adventure.

We paddled first to Froach Island and from there made an open crossing to Inch Connachan. We visited the ruins Lady Allen’s lodge house and the saw mill she built where the timber was cut for the lodge. This was followed by a trek in search of the illusive Loch Lomond Wallabies. Though none were sighted this time we did identify some fresh spoor, suggesting that they were not far away.

After we returned to the canoes, we set off on a very pleasant circumnavigation of Inch Tavannach, visiting an ancient crannog site, the statuette known as ‘Little Peter’ and Ardochlay on the way.

All in all a great day out.

 

Canoe Loch Lomond

Today (Monday 10th August) was definitely interesting. Having just endured the wettest July on record the forecast for today had been grim. However, we were pleasantly surprised when the morning rain was pretty light and the winds calm! The group set off for Inch Tavannach and made the island with ease. We then set off of Inch Tavannach and had only just landed when we were hit by the heaviest shower I can remember. Fortunately it didn’t last too long and, although it brought strengthening wind with it, the sun soon began to shine.

We had a great time as we came to the mouth of the river Luss as the torrential rain had increased the water flow into the loch giving us some fun ferry gliding in the moving water.

Well done to all that were there. It turned out a very enjoyable day.

 

Wild Lomond Trek

A wonderful day was had accompanying members of the Sierra Club on their West Highland Way trek from Drymen to Balmaha. The route took us over Conoc Hill, a volcanic hill forming part of the Highland Boundary Fault.

En route we observed and talked about flora and fauna, forestry practices, history and heritage. This included the clan structure in the area, historical and contemporary uses of the land, the potential for Loch Lomond being used as part of a cross nation canal and much more.

We saw buzzards, peacock butterflies, a robin and Dor Beetle, commonly known as Dung Beetles.

Although cool the weather was fine with only one significant shower.

Always a pleasure I look forward to undertaking this trek again next year.