Hidden Loch Lomond walk

Today  we made use of the lovely but rather cold and inclement weather and  provided a tailor made event , where guests explored the countryside around Luss on foot. During this day we were blessed with expansive views of Loch Lomond, Where our guide story told about the formation of the Loch, its history and colonization after the last ice age circa 10’000 years ago until today. Throughout the day we looked at Bush craft,plants uses an tried to paint a picture of the lifestyle and dwellings of the Picts. Before exploring the forested old slate quarries and lovely Glen with its beautiful river.The day was a great blend of exploration with a informative interpretation about landscape, heritage and nature. A great social day was had by all which included a visit to a The Loch Lomond arms ” Inn and finishing with fish n chips in the local town en route home .

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Glassy Calm Canoeing 21/8/17

A beautiful paddle today with a family of 5 on holiday from Germany. The water was so calm that we were able to travel a good distance. We visited the islands of Inchtavannach where we saw deer and Highland cows, Inchmoan, where we found deer tracks along the water’s edge and explored a ruined building, and Inchconnachan, where some of us went looking for more wildlife while others made tea and skimmed stones.

Loch Lomond Safari

Despite heavy rain fall in the afternoon, five clients and I had a great day.

Chris and his father, Tom, (celebrating his seventieth birthday) were joined by Rebecca, Elizabeth and Sarah three friends from Germany for an adventure on Loch Lomond.

We started from the Lodge on Loch Lomond Hotel and paddled down to Luss and Fraoch Island. This island is populated with gulls and kittiwakes at this time, whilst they sit on their eggs. No chicks were spotted but next week should see the beginning of the hatch.

From there we paddled to Inchconachan and went on a trek around the island in search of the elusive wallabies. We didn’t see any but we did come across some spoor which seemed quite fresh.

After leaving Inchconachan we visited Inchtavannach before heading back for Luss. It was then that the heavens opened and it rained heavily for the whole of our return journey. Surprisingly, it was great fun. The rain was coming down without wind, the heavy drops almost singing as they fell en-mass onto the still surface of the water. Magic!

Sausages and a Sausage Dog

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An intrepid canoe journey and bushcraft day for 4 people and one sausage dog. We began with some tandem paddling skills practice and journeyed south on Loch Lomond past the historic village of Luss. As there was a strong south westerly wind racing up the loch today, we rafted our canoes together so that we could more easily make the crossing to the islands. As we made the journey, we talked about Ben Lomond (Scotland’s most southerly munro), Conic Hill and the highland boundary and the various ways to ward off midgies, including the midge-repelling qualities of the plant Bog Myrtle. 

We chose a beach on Inchconnachan and were pleased to see a plentiful supply of driftwood washed ashore. After finding a safe and clear space and collecting a range of tinder and kindling, the group showed great perseverance, getting some of the best parks I’ve ever seen from a flint and striker, until the fire was alight. We made ourselves long skewers and cooked sausages over the fire, roasting sweet potatoes in the embers. We talked about the various methods of filtering and purifying water and also found some sphagnum moss and chatted about its anti-bacterial qualities. We came across blaeberries growing behind the beach and also some Bog Myrtle.

Once we had made sure we were leaving the beach as we found it, we returned to Luss in our raft and I think only Pippa the sausage dog was really glad to be back again. 

 

10km paddle on Loch Lomond

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Fantastic day for a long exploratory paddle among the islands of Loch Lomond. With only 3 of us on the trip, and a predominantly (and unusual) flat-calm day on the loch, we were able to focus on paddling skills enough to manage an impressive 10km paddle around the central cluster of islands on Loch Lomond, stopping on 3 of them to admire the views and enjoy the relatively unspoilt locations. We even managed to find time to brew some hot chocolate, forage for blaeberries and try out some solo paddling skills! As we journeyed, we chatted about the origins of Luss village, the Highland fault line and Conic Hill, the Colquhoun family and the Munros of Scotland. We saw Oyster Catchers, ducklings and Blackback gulls but unfortunately no wallabies. We were tested by a little headwind at times, especially when solo paddling, but my two companions were natural paddlers and picked up the subtleties of open boating very quickly. We were enjoying ourselves so much that we stayed out on the water for 5 hours in total, covering 10km in distance. We had glassy-still water for most of our trip and did not see one midge all day!